work in progress: muses

Currently I am the Georges Mora Fellow based at the State Library of Victoria until August 2019 https://artguide.com.au/jude-walton-awarded-2018-georges-mora-fellowship

 
 
Camille Claudel

Camille Claudel

Camille Claudel

"Mademoiselle Claudel has boldly tackled what may be the most difficult thing to render in statuary: a dance movement" Octave Mirabeau

"... who endeavors to follow the modifications of the human form in the process of energetic action? ... Movement, in effect, embodies a state of becoming" Mathias Morhardt 1898.

Le Vide: The Void image Musée Rodin (photographed by Jude Walton)

Le Vide: The Void image Musée Rodin (photographed by Jude Walton)

Intimate immensity - dancing with Alice

Meditations on bodies: touch, materiality, the sensual, and the subversive.

How can we live through the body and find intelligent responses to changing situations?

The project includes the development over time of a collaborative process that is shared and understood about how changes and interventions influence the interactions between people; how the flux and flow of energy in the space is altered by the choices that are made, how time can be manipulated, and ideas given form in the moment of performance.

It explores spontaneous composition … in the moment of doing.

It is based on somatic practice and education systems and techniques that support and encourage improvisation: Ideokinesis, BMC, the Alexander Technique, and Feldenkrais.

'Surrealist women' - Lee Miller (with teacup), Ady Fidelin, Nusch Éluard (with teacup), and Leonora Carrington at Lambe Creek, Cornwall in 1937 (photographed by Roland Penrose).

'Surrealist women' - Lee Miller (with teacup), Ady Fidelin, Nusch Éluard (with teacup), and Leonora Carrington at Lambe Creek, Cornwall in 1937 (photographed by Roland Penrose).

Muses: (to consider something thoughtfully and a person — especially a woman — who is a source of artistic inspiration)

Using feminine specificity as a strategy for destabilization, Muses, continues an artistic process that has social and political implications, begun with Nadja-Léona at the Alliance Française. While the project has roots in French female artists/muses of the early surrealist movement, the response is contemporary. It is in part a history project that brings the past into the now and places it alongside current issues of #metoo, gender identity and equality, feminist thinking and the place of the live body and the haptic sense within the art gallery.